Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Wake Wednesday - Browse Raleigh History with NC Digital Collections

It is hot outside.  Stay inside and have a browse the NC Digital Collections online? 
Why not start with this State Fair information book from 1899?  There are some beautiful advertising  graphics inside, as well as great historical context for Wake County and the rest of the state at the time. You can page through this volume much like browsing a physical book.
Don't miss the ads for Briggs Hardware, Raleigh Cotton Mills, St Mary's School, Southern Railway, and a host of others less well known that we surely need to keep in our memory. Fun!


    Wednesday, August 3, 2022

    Countdown to Saturday Aug.6 WCGS Special Virtual Event. 3-2-1...Reserve your spot!

    There are still some spots remaining for this event. Please remember to register at our event page (linked below after description). Registration will close Saturday, Aug 6 at 10am EDT.

    At this time the in-person portion is cancelled, and everyone will attend virtually via Zoom. Everyone who registered will receive the Zoom log in shortly before the event and have access to viewing on demand for 90 days after the presentation.

    Whether you are a genetic genealogy novice or an experienced researcher, Dana Leeds developed a method for sorting matches that has changed the process for all comers. It is the first tool that I use when I look at a new tester's results and I am not alone in that.

    Sample Leeds Chart

    About Dana Leeds and the August 6 presentations -

    Genetic Genealogist Dana Leeds started researching her family tree in 1998. She bought her first DNA kit in 2016 and solved her first unknown parentage case in early 2018. While working on another case that year, she created the innovative genetic genealogy tool known as the Leeds Method. This method quickly sorts DNA matches into clusters allowing the user to see which matches belong together. Dana quickly became a nationally known genetic genealogy speaker, and she enjoys helping others to easily understand and work with their DNA results. Her helpful creation has been shared widely on blogs (including her own), at Legacy Webinars, RootsTech, and other genealogy conferences.

    Dana will teach her Leeds Method in the first lecture of the day on August 6. All comers will leave with a simple but powerful new skill to work with their Autosomal DNA.

    For the second lecture of the afternoon, Dana will present a case study that just happened to turn her research to Wake County and involves the local Beddingfield surname. The presentation entitled “One Man, Multiple Names, an Unexpected DNA Discovery” tells the story of William Emmitt Hunter who arrived in Oklahoma around 1910 in his early to mid-30s. He married and raised eight children, but he apparently never told them about his past. Only DNA could unravel his secrets. This presentation will share the fascinating story of his family as well as the genetic and traditional genealogy methodology that was used to uncover it.

    Registration is filling up. Reserve your space soon. Please join us on August 6 for an educational and entertaining experience. Visit the Events page at Wakecogen.org to start your registration.

    We look forward to seeing you virtually on August 6.


    Visit the Wake County Genealogical Society - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact

    Wake Wednesday - NC Baptist Records


    There are several Wake County churches listed in this digital online special collection. You may find churches of interest in other NC locations too.

    Republished from 8/15/18
      

    Thursday, July 28, 2022

    Wake County Genealogical Society Monthy Meetings for 2022

    Join us for the next Virtual Meeting from WCGS!

    Tuesday, August 23, 2022 @ 6:30pm - Virtual
    Topic In Her Own Words: Lives of Women Through Correspondence and More
    Speaker: Diane L. Richards
     
    Women are traditionally challenging to document in historical public records. Personally written diaries, journals, correspondence, and more can help fill in gaps about female ancestors. This talk goes well past journals and diaries as “women” had voices in myriad ways.
    This virtual meeting and presentation is open to all, but registration is required.  

    Special Event:  Saturday, August 6, 2022;  10:30am-3:00pm
    A Day with Donna Leeds
    Topic 1 
    The Leeds Method of Organizing Your Autosomal DNA Matches
                     (This method offers tips to sort your Autosomal DNA matches into "grandparent" lines.)
    Topic 2 One Man, Multiple Names: An Unexpected DNA Discovery
                    (This talk features local research and a local discovery.)
    Speaker: Dana Leeds, creator of the Leeds DNA Sorting Method


    Tuesday, August 23, 2022 @ 6:30pm - Virtual
    Topic In Her Own Words: Lives of Women Through Correspondence and More
    Speaker: 
    Diane L. Richard,Genealogist, Author, NCGS Journal editor

    Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022 @ 6:30pm - Virtual
    Topic Discovering Mixed Race Heritage
    Speaker: 
    Dr. Arwin Smallwood,Historian, Writer and History Dept. Chair at NC A&T

    Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022 @ 6:30pm - Virtual
    Topic Searching for the Smiths
    Speaker: 
    Jessica Conklin

    Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022 @ 6:30pm - Virtual
    Topic Finding and Understanding NC Court Records
    Speaker: 
    David McCorkle

    Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images |Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact


    Wednesday, July 27, 2022

    Wake Wednesday - From the Baptist Grove to Moore Square

    Did you know that the land that is currently known as Moore Square was once referred to as the Baptist Grove?

    source

    I happened upon this tidbit while browsing thru an old issue of our Wake Treasures Journal. The reference is in an article titled Reminiscences of Grandmother Mary Ann Towles in Volume 1, number 4, Winter 1991, p15.

    Enjoy this picturesque description:
    Uncle William SHAW had a store on Fayetteville Street in Raleigh, and his dwelling house was on Wilmington Street. It was a large three story building with a beautiful garden, a large front, and a back yard. In one corner of the front yard, a big oak spread its branches over a large portion of the yard. Back of our lot was the Baptist grove.2 In the center of the grove stood a small wooden church, lighted with tallow candles in tin scones. The candles were lighted by a maiden lady, Miss Lucinda BRIGGS.  
    The location is noted in this footnote: 
    2 The Baptist Grove is now what is known as Moore’s Square, across from the old City Market. 
    Based upon other dates in the entry, this must have been ca. 1820. 

    This is just a sampling of the interesting bits of Wake history you will find in our Journal.


    Journal access is a great perk of your Wake County Genealogical Society membership and a handy tool for those researching in Wake County remotely. Members have 24/7 access to the Journal. With 30 years of content, you will likely find the surnames and place names you are researching. Access the Journal issues directly in the Member Area after log-in.




    This content is referenced with permission of Journal editor.

    Wednesday, July 20, 2022

    Wake Wednesday - Old Raleigh Building With Many Lives

    source
    This beautiful building sure had a lot of lives. Extra points if you know the story without even looking. Do you know all the names and functions it had over its long life. Sadly, this beautiful Wake county landmark that our ancestors would have strolled past on a leisurely afternoon is no more.

    You can read the wonderful twists and turns of this beauty's history in this Goodnight Raleigh blogpost

    Baptist Female University - built in Built in 1899 at the corner of Blount and Edenton streets.

    Baptist University for Women - name change in 1904.

    Meredith College - 1909 was renamed again, "in honor of Thomas Meredith, founder of the Biblical Reporter (1835) and an early 19th century advocate of higher education for women". The college was housed here until the mid 1920's when it relocated to the present location.

    Mansion Park Hotel - from the mid 1920's until sometime in the 1950's. The hotel advertised itself as Raleigh's "Most Comfortable Hotel" with reasonable rates, free parking, between Capitol and Governor's Mansion, 122 rooms, 100 bathrooms, Headquarters, Carolina Motor Club, AAA.
    source
    In the 1950's, this beautiful building was purchased by the state and used as office space including a driver's license office. This beautiful old "grand dame" was demolished in 1967. The location is now a parking lot. Ahhhhh.....progress.

    One more photo before I close. This one from the Meredith College website. A class photo from the college's early days. I love that they used the spectacular porches and stairways to pose. What a remarkable place with a remarkable story.
    source
    Were your ancestors part of this story?

    Tuesday, July 19, 2022

    Local Learning Opportunity: July 30 Presentation - Writing Your Family History - Features WCGS President, Carla Stancil

    Be sure to put July 30 on your calendar and call ahead for registration for this special event. Don't miss WCGS president, Carla Stancil team up with Lisa Lisson to offer tips to inspire, encourage and even help you over your writer's block. Share those stories. Leave a legacy!




     Visit the Wake County Genealogical Society - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact

    Monday, July 18, 2022

    Wake Treasures - Vol 31, Issue 1 is Available

    The latest issue of The Wake Treasures Journal is now live for reading or download at the Wakecogen website. Members should log in the member area to access it through the left sidebar. Here is a preview of what is inside from Journal editor, Donna Shackle.

    In this publication you will find a vignette of President Carla Stancil's Wake County ancestors, the City of Raleigh Death registers from 1900-1901, and the first article of the Ernest Haywood Files.  I'm particularly pleased to present you a series of letters to and from Carl Stancil, Carla Stancil's beloved father, while he was in the marines from 1944-1952.  This is a series of 144 letters to be published over the next issues of Wake Treasures and we are looking forward to having you follow Carl on his journey.  Warm thanks to Carla for sharing this piece of history with us.
     
    If you have any Wake County an ancestors or research, Wake Treasures would love to feature your work in a future issue.  We welcome submissions of research reports, narratives, and special articles.  If you have questions or want to learn more about being published in our award winning journal, feel free to contact me at journal@wakecogen.org.
     
    Please consider joining the journal team.  In order to make the publication possible, a team of volunteers works behind the scenes and needs your help.  There are currently openings for a content curator and transcribers.  If you're interested in learning more about how you can help, please contact me at Journal@wakecogen.org and I will be happy to discuss volunteering opportunities.
     
    Happy Reading, Donna, editor
     
    To download this new edition, log into the Members Area and go to the Wake Treasures webpage. And if you have personal stories of people, places, and events connected to Wake County, please consider sharing them for inclusion into future editions!


    Visit the Wake County Genealogical Society - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact

    Sunday, July 17, 2022

    Upchurch and Allied Families Association Newsletter - 2022

    For those of you following UAFA, here is the latest news. 

    Click on the link below to open the latest Footprints, the Upchurch and Allied Families newsletter. 

    July 2022 


    Visit the Wake County Genealogical Society - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact

    Wednesday, July 13, 2022

    Wake Wednesday - Where to put the permanent NC State Capital

    Would Wake County be very different if the choice of the state capital location had been different?

    How? Would roadways and growth centers be effected? Would a location five miles away make a difference?

    This is an interesting thought to ponder. I am sure it would have mattered more to the generations who came before us as their transportation and access to commerce would be most affected.

    Hunter vs. Lane

    The story of selecting the site of the permanent state capital is covered in this great article about inns and tavern from NCpedia. Isaac Hunter and Joel Lane are both represented here, as are several other important inns and taverns from the early days of colonial North Carolina.
    "Inns and taverns played an important role in the economic and geographic development of colonial North Carolina. These establishments-also known as "ordinaries" in eighteenth-century America because they often catered to the full spectrum of social classes-were frequently one of the first businesses to appear in newly designated county seats, offering food and lodging to travelers and visitors to court...."


    Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images |Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Wake Cemetery Survey c. 1978 online | Contact

    Thursday, June 30, 2022

    Special Event from Wake County Genealogical Society - A Day with Dana Leeds - August 6 afternoon



    A SATURDAY WITH DANA LEEDS
     Saturday, August 6
    12:45 pm to 5:00 pm
    Note change to Virtual via Zoom only

    A Saturday with Dana Leeds - Creator of the LEEDS method for Autosomal DNA analysis

    Where: Note this event is now virtual only see the WCGS Event page to register

    What: Wake County Genealogical Society is proud to host the one and only Dana Leeds, who will present two separate talks in this Saturday afternoon of genealogy. 

    Genetic Genealogist Dana Leeds started researching her family tree in 1998. She bought her first DNA kit in 2016 and solved her first unknown parentage case in early 2018. While working on another case that year, she created the innovative genetic genealogy tool known as the Leeds Method. This method quickly sorts DNA matches into clusters allowing the user to see which matches belong together. Dana quickly became a nationally known genetic genealogy speaker, and she enjoys helping others to easily understand and work with their DNA results. Her helpful creation has been shared widely on blogs (including her own), at Legacy Webinars, RootsTech, and other genealogy conferences.

    Presentation One: The Leeds Method of Organizing Your Autosomal DNA Matches
    Dana will introduce participants to the nuts and bolts of her “Leeds Method” of sorting matches into “grandparent” lines. Dana's method of sorting matches requires no prior knowledge of  DNA jargon or techniques, and even better, no prior knowledge of the focus tester’s matches. It is widely used to help solve unknown parentage cases. It is a simple, approachable method that is available to the novice and expert alike.

    Presentation Two: One Man, Multiple Names: An Unexpected DNA Discovery
    Dana will present a case study that just happened to turn her research to Wake County and involves the local Beddingfield surname. The presentation tells the story of William Emmitt Hunter who arrived in Oklahoma around 1910 in his early to mid-30s. He married and raised eight children, but he apparently never told them about his past. Only DNA could unravel his secrets. This presentation will share the fascinating story of his family as well as the genetic and traditional genealogy methodology that was used to uncover it. 

    There will be a 45 minute break between presentations.  Light snacks will be offered for on-site participants.

    Cost (for either in-person participation or virtual participation):

    WCGS Members: $10  (Sign into the member's area before making your selection in the store.)

    Non-Members: $20

    Learn more about the Leeds Method of working with your family DNA here.  Questions? Email George Thomas, Program Manager for the Wake County Genealogical Society.                 

    Advanced registration strongly recommended.  Limited seating for both in-person and virtual participants.  On-site registration (cash or check only) will be an option if any in-person slots remain after advanced registration.

    Visit our Events Page to register.

     


    Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images |Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Wake Cemetery Survey c. 1978 online | Contact



    Wednesday, June 29, 2022

    Wake Wednesday: The importance of Bloomsbury c.1771

    When Wake County was formed in 1771, there was no Raleigh. The city of Raleigh did not come into being until about twenty years later.

    The original center of business and county seat when Wake was first established was called Bloomsbury and alternately Wake Courthouse. It was the site of many Wake County firsts - first election, first court, first militia formation. I remember reading (in an old N&O article) that Bloomsbury may have been the sight of the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in Wake County. It is worth visiting that spot and imagining the magic of that moment. 

    A placque to commemorate the importance of the hamlet of Bloomsbury still stands near the Joel Lane house who gave the land on which the hamlet was located. The inscription  reads -

    On and around this spot stood the old town of 
    Bloomsbury
    or
    Wake Court-house
    which was erected and made the county seat when Wake County was established in 1771.
    This place was the rendezvous point of a part of Governor Tryon's army when he marched against the Regulators in 1771; Here met the state Revolutionary Assembly in 1781, and to this vicinity was removed the seat of government when the capital city of Raleigh was incorporated in 1792. This memorial placed by Bloomsbury Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution, A. D. 1911. 

    Source: docsouth.unc.edu


    Was Bloomsbury the location for the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in Wake County? Can you stand on that very spot today? Read on...

    Happy Independence Day.


    Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images |Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact



    https://www.carolana.com/NC/Towns/Bloomsbury_NC.html