Thursday, April 11, 2024

Make Your Mark on Local History: Become the New WCGS Webmaster!

 

Are you our web hero?

Do you have a passion for genealogy and a knack for tech? Do you enjoy helping others connect with their past?
 

Look no further! The Wake County Genealogical Society is seeking a new Webmaster to help us keep our website at the forefront of local family history research.

 
Make a Difference for Researchers Everywhere

Our website is the first point of contact for genealogists near and far interested in Wake County research. You'll be the hero that ensures our website runs smoothly and offers easy access to a wealth of information, including:

· Upcoming events you won't want to miss

· Fascinating blog posts, articles, and historical content

· Free access to our extensive cemetery survey images, Wake Treasures Journals, and Wake Genealogy Watch newsletters

· Valuable research resources on Wake County, North Carolina genealogy, and society surnames

 Join a Collaborative and Supportive Community

We're not just about tech – we're about people too! As Webmaster, you'll be part of a friendly and supportive community of genealogists who share your passion for family history. You'll have the opportunity to:

· Collaborate with a fun group of volunteers who are as enthusiastic about genealogy as you are

· Gain valuable experience and learn new skills (or put your existing skills to good use!)

· Make a significant contribution to the success of the Wake County Genealogical Society

Flexible, remote position

This job is perfect for you if you like to work from home and/or you live elsewhere but still want to contribute to WCGS. No prior experience is necessary.  Whether you're a seasoned web pro or eager to expand your skillset, we'll provide the training and resources you need to succeed. Time committment is 1.5 -2 hours per month.
 

Ready to Make Your Mark?

If you're interested in becoming the Webmaster who helps us connect researchers with their ancestors, contact our Volunteer Coordinator, Saundra Cropps, today at info@wakecogen.org!

More details on the WCGS Webmaster Position are posted here.




Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images | Society Surnames | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact

 

Wednesday, April 10, 2024

Wake Wednesday - Historic Roads in Raleigh

Enjoy a little light historical reading with this fun article about the older roads in our area. 

"When Raleigh first came into existence at the end of the 18th century, it was often called “a city of streets with no houses,” a square-mile grid designed by surveyor and onetime state senator William Christmas. Downtown’s principal streets—think Wilmington, Hillsborough, New Bern Avenue—radiated from the central statehouse, where the Capitol Building now stands. Each street was named for one of North Carolina’s eight judicial districts, and North, South, East and West Streets created geographical boundaries to Raleigh’s 400-acre city center. As the city’s population grew, so did its footprint, creating a sprawling artery system of highways and backroads."  - Tracy Jones, Raleighmag


Plan of the City of Raleigh, 1797

To find out the rest of the story about some historic roads in plain sight that you travel often, visit the online article - Historic Roads of Raleigh, by Tracy Jones

 

Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images | Society Surnames | Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact




 





Wednesday, April 3, 2024

Wake Wednesday - Latta University Historic Park Dedication - April 20, 2024 - Register by April 12

Join Raleigh Parks for the dedication of Latta University Historic Park! 

This park contributes to a rich history that deepens our understanding of African American life in Raleigh at the turn of the 20th century. 

All parking for this event will be at Jaycee Park (2405 Wade Ave, Raleigh, NC 27607), which is a five-minute walk from Latta University Historic Park (1001 Parker Street, Raleigh, NC 27607). Transportation from the parking area to the event via trolley will also be available starting at 3:45 p.m.

Event Details

Ages: All

Cost: Free

RSVP by Friday, April 12

Email: RSVP@raleighnc.gov

Phone: 919-996-3285

Event Website - https://raleighnc.gov/parks/events/latta-university-historic-park-dedication 

See historic resourse links below.

The Latta House was a home in the African American neighborhood of Oberlin, but it was so much more. The home was the last remaining building of the Latta University complex that included a tradeschool, gradeschool, dormitories and an orphanage. The University was the vision and purpose of Reverand Morgan London Latta, a freedman and former slave who received his education at Shaw University. His overarching purpose in creating the coeducational Latta University was to provide an education to underprivileged and orphan children in Raleigh’s Black community.

Wikipedia

Latta University existed as a school from 1892 to 1920. In its prime, the university encompassed about 300 acres and had 23 buildings. After the school shut down in 1920, the land was sold and the buildings disappeared and the village grew up around the last remaining structure. That structure was the Latta home, a beautiful Queen Anne style home built in the early 1900s, Sadly the Latta home burned beyond saving in 2007.

The event on April 20 will recognize this Grand Dame of a home and Rev. Latta's history and contributions in the surrounding community.  The park will ensure that many know this story in Raleigh's African American history.

More about Reverand Latta, the Latta House and Latta University - 

Lost University: How an entire college vanished near downtown Raleigh - a documentary by Heather Leah

The Dreams That Linger - Our State Magazine by T. Edward Nickens

Rev. M. L. Latta House at Wikipedia - Be sure to see the wonderful collection of linked photos of Rev. Latta, his family and the University property in its heyday.

And of course, (because you know I love the wealth of resources and historic context in these documents)...

The Latta House Architectural Report for the Raleigh Historic District Commission and City of Raleigh which includes photos of the campus and the home before and after the fire.


Visit Wake County Genealogical Society's Website - Homepage | WCGS Events | Join WCGS | Publications | Wake Cemetery Survey Images |Digital Resources | History Resources | More Links and Resources | Contact